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The Alabama AIDS Education & Training Center (AETC), Medical AIDS Outreach, and the Southeast AETC invite applicants to the 2017 Minority AIDS Initiative (MAI) Fellowship program.

The MAI Fellowship is a new incarnation of the former Alabama AETC MAI Scholarship, which granted conference funds to healthcare professionals. The expanded MAI Fellowship program will now engage a select number of fellows to participate in a yearlong continuous learning opportunity and commitment to building statewide capacity for reducing new HIV infections and the impact of STIs and Hepatitis in Alabama.

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Eligibility

Eligible applicants must be healthcare or social service providers or professionals working in the state of Alabama. They must also meet one or more of the following criteria:

·   Identify as a person of color and/or a member of a racial or ethnic minority community

·   Provide healthcare or other related services to individuals and communities of color and/or racial or ethnic minority individuals and communities in the state of Alabama or – intend on doing so after graduation

We particularly invite applicants from practice fields of nursing, pharmacy, medicine, counseling, clinical social work, case management, public health and health education. Preference will be given to applicants exhibiting a strong commitment to Alabama communities, particularly in rural or otherwise under-served areas. Priority will be given to applicants who have not previously received MAI Scholarship funds. We encourage applicants with both professional and personal experiences in each topic area.

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Opportunities

There are 6 fellowship opportunities, all linked to a topic considered priority for AETC training in 2017. Applicants may apply for only one fellowship opportunity. Fellowship opportunities are listed on the following page with subtopics of particular interest to Alabama AETC.

Each topic area should be considered in conjunction with the larger scope of the Minority AIDS Initiative, which seeks to “improve access to HIV care and health outcomes for disproportionately affected minority populations, including [B]lack populations… [and to] expand the pool of minority providers in underserved communities.”

(1) Fellowship for the Health of Black Gay, Bisexual, & Queer Men

  • Cultural humility and quality healthcare with Black gay, bisexual, and queer men + other men who have sex with men (MSM)
  • Innovation in HIV and STI prevention with Black gay, bisexual, and queer men + other MSM
  • Improving the HIV Care Continuum for Black gay, bisexual, and queer men + other MSM
  • Gay, bisexual, and queer identities in Black communities
  • Collaboration with faith-based institutions
  • Trauma and HIV
  • Developing capacity of Alabama-based professionals to provide quality community education and client-centered support to combat:
    • Heightened HIV and STI risk for Black gay, bisexual, and queer men + other MSM
    • Impact of stigma on the health and well-being of Black gay, bisexual, and queer men + other MSM in Alabama

(2) Fellowship for the Health of Transgender & Gender Nonconforming Alabamians

  • Cultural humility and quality healthcare with transgender and gender nonconforming (GNC) people
  • Innovation in HIV and STI prevention with transgender and GNC people
  • Improving the HIV Care Continuum for transgender and GNC people
  • Diverse identities and experiences within transgender and GNC communities
  • Trauma and HIV
  • Developing capacity of Alabama-based professionals to provide quality community education and client-centered support to combat:
    • Heightened HIV and STI risk for transgender and GNC people
    • Co-occuring risks of violence, substance abuse, and HIV

(3) Fellowship for the Health of Incarcerated or Formerly Incarcerated People

  • Cultural humility and quality healthcare with incarcerated or formerly incarcerated people
  • Innovation in HIV and STI prevention with incarcerated or formerly incarcerated people
  • Improving the HIV Care Continuum for incarcerated or formerly incarcerated people
  • Trauma, incarceration, and HIV
  • Developing capacity of healthcare providers and professionals working within or in conjunction with correctional institutions, as well as those providing services to formerly incarcerated people, to provide quality community education and client-centered support to:
    • Combat disproportionate risk for HIV and STIs in incarcerated and formerly incarcerated populations
    • Increase education, testing, linkage, and retention services for incarcerated and formerly incarcerated populations

(4) Fellowship for the Health of Rural Alabamians

  • Cultural humility and quality healthcare with rural people living with HIV or at risk of contracting HIV and STIs
  • Innovation in HIV and STI prevention with rural populations
  • Improving the HIV Care Continuum for rural people
  • Trauma and HIV
  • Risk of HIV/HCV outbreak in rural counties
  • Rural religiosity and collaboration with faith communities
  • Developing capacity of rural healthcare professionals to provide quality community education and client-centered support to combat:
    • High HIV and STI risk for rural Alabamians
    • Geographical barriers to care

(5) Fellowship for the Health of Substance Users

  • Cultural humility and quality healthcare with people using or addicted to controlled or illicit substances (including alcohol)
  • Innovation in HIV and STI prevention with people using or addicted to controlled or illicit substances
  • Improving the HIV Care Continuum for people using or addicted to controlled or illicit substances
  • Trauma, substance use, and HIV/HCV
  • Harm reduction approaches
  • Collaboration with professional and community-based partners in rural and urban areas at highest risk of HIV/HCV infection associated with injection drug use

(6) Fellowship for the Engagement of Primary Care Practitioners in HIV Prevention and Care

  • Role of primary care practitioners (nurse practitioners, physicians, physician assistants) in HIV prevention, testing, and treatment
  • Universal HIV screening
  • Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) as a primary care intervention
  • LGBTQ cultural competence in the primary care setting
  • Developing capacity of primary care practitioners to
    • Recognize the impact of the HIV epidemic on their local and regional communities
    • Implement universal HIV screening
    • Effectively counsel and link people living with HIV to care
    • Offer PrEP to eligible patients
    • Work in collaboration with HIV specialty providers

College graduate on campus

Benefits:

      • Funding for one or more conferences related to your topic area (including registration fees, travel, lodging costs, meals & incidentals)
      • Funding for travel and lodging (if necessary) for attendance at the 2017 MAI Fellowship Gathering in Montgomery on March 24th, 2017
      • Free training on adult education and formal presentations
      • Free registration to the Alabama Health Disparities Conference on February 11th, 2017 in Montgomery (not mandatory to attend)
      • Networking and collaboration with other Alabama-based fellows
      • Support for continued training and learning from Alabama AETC staff

Requirements:

      • Attendance at the MAI Fellowship Gathering
      • Attendance at a conference associated with your fellowship opportunity (selected in collaboration with Alabama AETC)
      • At least two formal AETC presentations with healthcare professionals on a subject related to your topic area
      • At least two blog posts for the MAO website about your experiences and interests as an MAI fellow
      • Bi-monthly reports (1 page) to Alabama AETC on knowledge and skills gained at conferences or training, questions, developing themes, and ideas for collaborative work with AETC and partners across the state
      • Informal assistance with promotion of AETC training
      • Informal involvement in AETC planning and activities, including optional volunteering with Alabama AETC at state conferences and other events

*Please Note: Applicants are responsible for making arrangements with their employer to attend the Fellows Gathering on March 24th, 2017 and a conference associated with their chosen topic (Alabama AETC will work with each applicant to select an appropriate conference). Supervisors must explicitly confirm their support of applicant attendance at the March 24th Fellows Gathering and express an understanding that the applicant will need to, either on duty or through paid leave or vacation, attend an out-of-town conference in 2017 lasting from 3 – 5 days in duration

To Apply:

A complete application packet consists of the following:

      1. Completion of the online application
      2. A resume or CV
      3. A cover letter describing why you are interested in being an MAI fellow in the topic area you’ve selected
      4. A letter of support from your direct supervisor (if a professional) or an instructor/professor (if a student). If you are in private practice or otherwise have no supervisor, please explain your situation in the cover letter. Professionals should discuss attendance commitments and other requirements of the fellowship with their supervisor.

These items should be emailed to alabamaaetc@gmail.com with the Subject: MAI Fellows by January 13th at 5 pm.

Alabama AETC will not send out reminders for your additional documents. We will always confirm via email that a sent document has been received. You may contact us during general working hours at alabamaaetc@gmail.com or 334-288-8091 during the month of December to inquire about received documents.

To print a copy of these instructions, click here.

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